Michiana Central Service Office

818 E. Jefferson Blvd., Suite A

South Bend, IN 46617

(574) 234-7007

aa_michiana@sbcglobal.net

Mon/Wed/Fri: 1pm - 5pm

​​Tue/Thur:         9am - 1pm

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Copyright 2018 Michiana Sober

Learn About AA

About AA

AA is an informal society of more than 2 million recovering alcoholics throughout the world. In the Michiana Area, we have over 120 local meetings throughout the week. Meetings range in size from a handful to larger groups of 40 to 50 members.

AA is nonprofessional, as such it doesn't have clinics, doctors, counselors or psychologists. All members are themselves recovering from alcoholism. There is no central authority controlling how AA groups operate. It is up to the members of each group to decide what they do. However, the AA program of recovery has proved to be so successful that almost every group follows it in very similar ways.

AA is not a religious organization nor is it affiliated with any religious body. It welcomes members of all religions, agnostics and atheists alike.

You don't have to sign up or pay anything to be a member. You're a member of a group if you choose to be. You can come and go as you please. No one is "in charge" of a group. We work through the offer of help and suggestion only. No one can tell you what you should or shouldn't do.

AA works through members telling their stories of what we used to be like, what happened and what we are like now. The AA program, known as The Twelve Steps, provides a framework for self-examination and a road to recovery, free of alcohol.
 

What AA Does Not Do

  • Solicit members

  • Engage in or sponsor research

  • Keep attendance records or case histories

  • Join "councils" of social agencies

  • Follow up or try to control its members

  • Make medical or psychological diagnoses or prognoses

  • Provide drying-out or nursing services, hospitalization, drugs, or any medical or psychiatric treatment

  • Offer religious services

  • Provide housing, food, clothing, jobs, money or any other welfare or social services

  • Provide domestic or vocational counseling

  • Accept any money for its services, or any contributions from non-AA sources

  • Provide letters of reference to parole boards, lawyers, court officials, social agencies, employers, etc.

  • Directly support issues with addiction other than alcohol


We welcome the opportunity to share the AA experience with those who have a desire to stop drinking and improve their lifestyle through proven AA methods.